Dear Gov. Brown, What's a Vagina Worth? I Support Women's Rights

(800) 511-3838 |

Monsanto’s Roundup Tied to Cancer

Monsanto intentionally suppressed information from the public. Get the facts.

What They Knew

The FDA approved Abilify in 2002. In May 2015, the FDA published a safety announcement stating that Abilify is linked to several “compulsive or uncontrollable urges” including compulsive gambling. On May 4, 2016, the FDA required that Abilify have a new warning label listing the potential for these hazardous behaviors.

When They Knew It

In the early stages of testing Abilify, doctors recognized that hypersexuality, a form of compulsive behavior, was an adverse effect of patients who took this medication. However, the warning label never alerted patients to this potential problem. Additionally disconcerting is that in October 2012, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) – which is like our FDA – added a warning label to Abilify to reflect the potential for pathological gambling. Even Canada added this warning to Abilify labels before the United States in November 2015.

Countless patients around the world have been reporting that after taking Abilify, they had an uncontrollable urge to gamble.

  • In March 2010, a 64-year-old women who was taking 15 mg of Abilify reported that she couldn’t stop gambling or over-eating.
  • In December 2010, a study was published that found a link between how mutant HTR2B (a receptor that Abilify effects) increases impulsive behaviors.
  • In January 2016, Nicholas T. Meyer filed a lawsuit against Bristol-Myers Squibb which caused him, “harmful compulsive behaviors including compulsive gambling [and resulted] in substantial, financial, mental, and physical damages.”

What Can You Do

If you took Abilify and had a gambling problem after taking this medication, you may be able to receive compensation. You and your family may have experienced stress and suffering as a result of this destructive compulsive behavior and have accumulated bills or were forced to take time off of work because of it. There was a minimum of 3 ½ years where Bristol-Myers Squibb knew that their drug could cause uncontrollable urges, and yet they never warned doctors or patients of these horrible adverse effects. Contact us today to see if you qualify to make a claim.

Roundup Warnings In The News

BREAKING (8/30/18): How safe is Monsanto's Roundup? Jury verdict gives cause for pause

It’s been three weeks since a San Francisco jury found that exposure to Monsanto’s Roundup herbicides contributed to former school groundskeeper Dewayne” Lee” Johnson’s terminal cancer and awarded a stunning $289 million in damages to the 46-year-­old father.

During that time, we’ve seen repeated assertions from the pesticide giant and its allies that, in fact, the jury was wrong and the weed killer of choice for millions.

Read Full Article

 

BREAKING (8/10/18): Monsanto Owes $289M In Landmark Roundup Cancer Trial

 

A California jury held Friday that Monsanto’s Roundup and Ranger Pro herbicides contributed to a school groundskeeper’s lymphoma and slapped the company with a combined $289 million in compensatory and punitive damages in a landmark suit against the agricultural giant, which has denied links between its herbicides and cancer for decades.

After three days of deliberating, a unanimous 12-member jury found that Monsanto’s herbicides were unsafe and were a substantial factor in causing harm to plaintiff DeWayne “Lee” Johnson. The jury also found that Monsanto had failed to adequately warn customers of the risks associated with its Roundup and stronger Ranger Pro products, and that the company acted with malice or
oppression.

Read Full Article

8/2/18: New York Toxicologist Proves Roundup Causes Cancer in Current San Francisco Trial

 

In the current trial involving Monsanto’s Roundup versus former groundskeeper DeWayne Johnson, evidence was presented that glyphosate shows a strong link to cancer. Hopefully these findings will finally hold Monsanto accountable for putting the health of countless people at risk.

Johnson was a groundskeeper for the school district in Benicia, a suburb near San Francisco, and would regularly spray Roundup as part of his job averaging about 150 gallons of Roundup 20 to 30 times a year. During the four years that he was employed in this position, he started to develop rashes and lesions. Soon after, he was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a specific type of blood cancer.

Read Full Article

 

7/25/18: Monsanto Trial: Toxicologist Explains to Jury How Monsanto Colluded With EPA

 

 

The plaintiff, Dewayne Johnson, a 46-year-old former school groundskeeper who was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma four years ago, claims Monsanto hid evidence that the active ingredient in its Roundup herbicide, glyphosate, caused his cancer.

This is the first case to go to trial among hundreds of lawsuits alleging Roundup caused non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The trial is expected to last about a month. (Read recap).

Read Full Article

 

 

6/18/18: Roundup Trial to Start This Week

Monsanto, makers of the controversial weedkiller Roundup, is once again centerstage as they struggle to prove the safety of their product in a bellwether-like trial being held in California Superior Court, San Francisco.

This case centers around Lee Johnson, a 46-year old groundskeeper who worked for the school district of Benicia (located in the San Francisco Bay Area). His job required him to mix hundreds of gallons of Roundup and by July 2014, just two years after starting the job, Johnson was diagnosed with a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a cancer that has been linked to the use of glyphosate, the main ingredient found in Roundup. Even after completing chemotherapy and other treatments, Johnson recently received the painful news from his oncologist that he has only six months to live.

Read Full Article

6/27/17: California Is Adding a Chemical Found in Monsanto's Roundup Weed Killer to Its List of Cancer-Causing Agents

 

 

Glyphosate, an herbicide and the active ingredient in Monsanto Co’s popular Roundup weed killer, will be added to California’s list of chemicals known to cause cancer effective July 7, the state’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) said on Monday.

Monsanto vowed to continue its legal fight against the designation, required under a state law known as Proposition 65, and called the decision “unwarranted on the basis of science and the law.”

Read Full Article

7/13/17: Does the World’s Top Weed Killer Cause Cancer? Trump’s EPA Will Decide

Far from settling the matter, eight of the 15 experts expressed significant concerns about the EPA’s benign view of glyphosate, and three more expressed concerns about the data. Their skepticism also raised, again, questions about the independence of the Office of Pesticide Programs, which has the final say on permitting pesticides. The office relies on pesticide manufacturers for the data it uses in making health decisions—and got almost 30 percent of its operating budget from the industry last year.

Read Full Article

Damaging Effects of Roundup (and Its Active Ingredient Glyphosate)

Glyphosate accumulates in the food portion of Roundup Ready plants, for which allowable residue herbicide thresholds have been increased by up to 200-fold. Glyphosate exposure has been linked to sterility, hormone
disruption, abnormal and lower sperm counts, miscarriages, damaged human embryonic and placental cells, placental cell death, birth defects, and cancer. It is also toxic and lethal to amphibians.

Read Full Article

Filed Roundup Complaints & Damages

7/19/17: Poulson et al v. Monsanto Company

The IARC Working Group classified glyphosate as a Group 2A herbicide, which means that it is probably carcinogenic to humans. The IARC Working Group concluded that the cancers most associated with glyphosate exposure are non-Hodgkin lymphoma and other haematopoietic cancers, including lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia, B-cell lymphoma, and multiple myeloma.

Read Full Case

6/20/17: Blitz, Thomas et al v. Monsanto Company et al

Monsanto labels, advertises, and promotes their retail Roundup® products, including but not limited to their Roundup® “Garden Weeds” Weed & Grass Killer products(“Roundup” or “Roundup Products”),1 with the false statement that Roundup’s active ingredient, glyphosate, targets an enzyme that is not found “in people or pets.”

However, this claim is false, misleading, and deceptive, as the enzyme that glyphosate targets is found in people and pets—specifically, in beneficial gut bacteria critical to their health and wellbeing, including their immune system, digestion, allergies, metabolism, and even their brain function.

Read Full Case

11/7/16: Randall Dean Seidl v. Monsanto Company

For nearly 40 years, farms across the world have used Roundup® without knowing of the dangers its use poses. That is because when Monsanto first introduced Roundup®, it touted glyphosate as a technological breakthrough: it could kill almost every weed without causing harm either to people or to the environment. Of course, history has shown that not to be true. According to the WHO, the main chemical ingredient of Roundup®—glyphosate—is a probable cause of cancer. Monsanto assured the public that Roundup® was harmless. In order to prove this, Monsanto has championed falsified data and has attacked legitimate studies that revealed Roundup®’s dangers. Monsanto has led a prolonged campaign of misinformation to convince government agencies, farmers and the general population that Roundup® is safe.

Read Full Case

9/8/16: Harris et al v. Monsanto Company et al

This is an action for damages suffered by Plaintiffs as a direct and proximate result of Defendants’ negligent and wrongful conduct in connection with the design, development, manufacture, testing, packaging, promoting, marketing, advertising, distribution, labeling, and/or sale of the herbicide Roundup, containing the active ingredient glyphosate.

Plaintiffs maintain that Roundup and/or glyphosate is defective, dangerous to human health, unfit and unsuitable to be marketed and sold in commerce, and lacked proper warnings and directions as to the dangers associated with its use. Plaintiffs’ injuries were avoidable.

Read Full Case

Monsanto’s Roundup Settlement Information

Featured Roundup Health Resources

5 Unbelievable Facts About Roundup

Many people are wondering if the hype surrounding Roundup’s dangers are justified. Is Roundup a needed herbicide or a danger to consumers? Find out now.

Featured Roundup Health Resources

5 Unbelievable Facts About Roundup

Many people are wondering if the hype surrounding Roundup’s dangers are justified. Is Roundup a needed herbicide or a danger to consumers? Find out now.

GET YOUR FREE Roundup CASE REVIEW TODAY

Roundup settlements are now being negotiated, but there is a limited window to pursue help. If you think you, a friend, or a family member may qualify, get your free case review today… before it’s too late!

  • * Submit now to learn if you may be eligible for a cash settlement or call (800) 511-3838 now.

Free Guide Download

The Step-By-Step Guide To Taking Action

How to File for Financial Settlement After Injury from an Unsafe Drug or Device

Free Guide Download

The Step-By-Step Guide To Taking Action

How to File for Financial Settlement After Injury from an Unsafe Drug or Device

LATEST ARTICLES

Sling Vs. Mesh: What’s the Difference?

Talking about transvaginal mesh (TVM) can be confusing. There are words like “polypropylene,” “mesh migration,” and “pelvic organ prolapse” that can be difficult to understand. Additionally, sometimes words seem interchangeable like “sling” and “mesh.” Here are a few things that you need to know if you have or are thinking about having a TVM implant.

Sling Vs. Mesh: What’s the Difference?

Slings vs. Mesh

First of all, transvaginal mesh – commonly abbreviated to TVM – covers both slings and mesh. TVM is usually made out of a plastic called polypropylene. It looks somewhat like a window screen and the plastic itself is many times used to make fishing line.

Slings are mainly used for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and are commonly referred to as “tapes.” This is because the mesh is cut into a long, thin strip much like a piece of scotch tape. SUI occurs usually in women who have given birth and in women who are 44 years old and older. SUI is when a woman laughs, coughs, or sneezes and then experiences urine leakage. The sling supports the tube that urine passes through (called the urethra) and the neck of your bladder (where your bladder connects to your urethra) to help prevent leaks.

There are also two types of slings: pubovaginal and suburethral. A pubovaginal sling has a minimally invasive surgery involving a small vaginal incision where the sling is placed under the urethra to support the organ. A suburethral sling sits around the urethra and is actually attached to the abdominal wall. This is a more invasive procedure and requires a couple of days in the hospital following the surgery.

Now let’s talk about mesh which is primarily used for pelvic organ prolapse (POP). POP is when some of the vaginal walls are weakened and then the bladder, rectum, small bowel and/or uterus sag near or in the vaginal opening. As you can imagine, it’s going to take a bit more than a skinny tape-like device to hold all these organs back where they belong. Mesh can be used to support these organs like a hammock.

Mesh Complications

Slings and mesh sound great, right? I mean, who wants to leak pee or have their organs protruding from their vagina? However, tens of thousands of complications have been reported among TVM patients including mesh erosion (when the mesh breaks apart), migration (when the mesh moves around in the body), tissue and organ damage (which happens when the sharp edges slice surrounding areas), and dyspareunia (where the mesh lodges in the vagina and causes painful sex). There are other procedures and devices – such as colporrhaphy and pessaries – that don’t have these harmful lasting adverse effects. When you think about it, women have been having babies and have been aging for thousands of years without using harmful TVM. Why is this dangerous device being put in women at all?!

TVM is truly a crime against women. This defective plastic breaks, slices, and creates irreparable damage causing women to no longer be able to work or function in daily tasks due to the excruciating pain. It also harms relationships because of the physical and mental stress it imposes and due to the lack of physical intimacy resulting from broken mesh (if it moves into the vagina, the sharp edges can slice the penis). These women are suffering, embarrassed, angry, and have lost so much… all so that big pharmaceutical companies can make a lot of money.

If you had complications that needed mesh removal, please contact Periscope Group today. We would love to hear your story and we want to help you if we can. TVM is a dangerous product that was never fully tested and has ruined tens of thousands of women’s lives around the world. It’s time that your voice is heard!

##
Sources
“Talking about Slings and Meshes. There is a difference!”. Central Florida Urogynecology. Accessed July 30, 2018. http://www.cfurogyn.com/articles/prolapse/SlingsAndMeshes.html
“Sling vs. Mesh: What You Need to Know”. Urogynecology University of Colorado. Accessed July 30, 2018. https://urogyn.coloradowomenshealth.com/blog/sling-vs-mesh
“Colporrhaphy”. Encyclopedia of Surgery. Accessed August 6, 2018. http://www.surgeryencyclopedia.com/Ce-Fi/Colporrhaphy.html

Medical Device Companies Fail to Accurately Report Health Complications to FDA: Are You At Risk?

16,000 complaints involving Essure – a coil-like permanent birth control device- were reported to its manufacturer, Conceptus Inc., between January 2008 and December 2010. However, during that same time period of time, Conceptus (which was acquired by Bayer AG in 2013) filed only 182 reports of patient harm with the FDA. That’s a mere 1.1%. Worse yet, 750,000 Essure implants were sold worldwide until Bayer voluntarily – no, not recalled – pulled it from market in 2018 due to a 70% decrease in sales. So how can a medical device company get away with only reporting a small fraction of complaints to the FDA? Why was Bayer not penalized by the FDA for their negligence in reporting which put hundreds of thousands of women at risk?

Medical Device Companies Fail to Accurately Report Health Complications to FDA: Are You At Risk?

Problems with the FDA Reporting System

According to an intensive study conducted by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), there are three major flaws involving device companies and the process of reporting to the FDA:

  1. “FDA inspections have found more than 4,400 violations by device companies of its rules for handling complaints and reporting device problems in the last decade. Each violation can include hundreds or even thousands of mishandled complaints.”
  2. “Manufacturers and others required to report adverse events have classified more than 2,200 episodes in which patients died not as deaths but as injuries, malfunctions or other less severe events in the last five years.”
  3. “The FDA has allowed companies to obscure thousands of injury reports using a program called alternative summary reporting that allows them to keep the information from the public.”

Clearly there are far too many loopholes in the approval and management of medical devices that by far benefit the pharmaceutical companies at the cost of patient health. For example, it can be a grey area to determine if the device itself caused a patient death since the body can shut down at various levels. In the case of the manufacturer Thoratec Corp., a patient had a HeartMate II implant which provides circulatory support to patients with advanced heart disease. When the patient died, two suspected causes of death were reported: “suspected pump thrombus,” a device failure caused by a blood clot that blocks the pump, and multisystem organ failure. Thoratec’s report mentions the patient’s death, but cites the incident as an injury and faults organ failure as the cause of death. The obvious question here is did the mechanical failure cause the organs to shut down? One (of the many) problems is that with hundreds of thousands of complaints reported to the FDA’s Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database, it can be an insurmountable task to thoroughly evaluate each reported event. However, pump blockages were a common enough problem with this device that the FDA issued a safety warning for them in 2015.

Foreign Medical Device Companies

While there’s a laundry list of things wrong with the FDA and how it manages the medical device industry, it’s important to mention that it’s the best agency of its kind in the world. In fact,  Europe’s Eudamed adverse events database is accessible only to regulators and industry professionals, in Chile reporting adverse events is voluntary, and in Mexico this data is hidden from the public. So this brings us to another problem: if the U.S. is having trouble managing its own medical device companies, how are we monitoring foreign made products?

Last year in May 2018, 60 Minutes ran an important story exposing Boston Scientific (makers of transvaginal mesh) and how they smuggled counterfeit polypropylene material from a company in China due to a shortage in the U.S. And there are many layers to this story: not only is polypropylene a fragile material that can erode, migrate, shrink and cause many painful health complications, but an unverified foreign product increases the potential for injuries. When Boston Scientific compared the U.S. approved plastic with the foreign one, this is what they found: “They analyzed 11 different parameters, looking at the two plastics side by side, done, the same tests. Nine of those were different,” cites the 60 Minutes program. “Two were the same, nine were different. And of those nine that were different, four of those parameters were very different. And somehow, from that, they concluded that it was the same material.” Boston Scientific denied all allegations, but more than 48,000 lawsuits have been filed against the company on behalf of injured women.

Do You Have a Medical Device?

Not all medical devices are bad nor are they beneficial. As patients, our job is to be our best advocate. Research your surgery procedure and potential medical device online. Visit your doctor with a list of prepared questions or email your doctors to get the answers that you’re looking for. Weigh the risks and benefits to any procedure to determine the best choice for your health. We also need to speak out against bad medical device companies and FDA loopholes… our health depends on it.

 

##
Sources
“How medical device harm is concealed”. ICIJ. Accessed January 30, 2019. https://www.icij.org/investigations/implant-files/how-medical-device-harm-is-concealed/?fbclid=IwAR0IfmV3sL4dcf7KWT_gP5Ta5XGtjfj-_UD1SVdE6TcKNIrj2ouLPxLGK9c
“Women sounded alarm on Essure birth control device. Now the FDA is cracking down.”. NBC News. Accessed January 30, 2019. https://www.nbcnews.com/health/womens-health/women-sounded-alarm-essure-birth-control-device-now-fda-cracking-n865531
“CBS News’ 60 Minutes Interviews Dr. Duane Priddy for Gynecological Polypropylene Mesh Investigation”. MarketWatch. Accessed January 30, 2019. https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/cbs-news-60-minutes-interviews-dr-duane-priddy-for-gynecological-polypropylene-mesh-investigation-2018-05-17

Important Information You Should Know About Medical Implants

From knee replacements to breast implants to IVC filters, there are countless medical devices that are being implanted into millions of people every year. (Kind of reminds me of the 1970’s show The Six Million Dollar Man with Lee Majors.) Even though these types of procedures seem almost commonplace, every surgery is nerve wracking and comes with a certain amount of risk. It’s also important to realize that every medical device and implant comes with benefits and risks beyond the actual surgery itself. Here are some common questions and answers that patients have concerning these devices.

Tens of millions of Americans have medical implants, but what do we really know about these devices? If you have one or are planning to have surgery, read more here.

Is there a difference between a medical implant and medical device?

It seems that these two words are interchangeable, but they can mean different things in the medical world. Generally speaking, a medical implant is something that goes inside your body or connects to your body such as a hip replacement or a mechanism that internally delivers medicine such as a chemotherapy port.

A medical device is the general term that can include implants, but may also be used when referring to medical tools that are used in surgery, bandages to cover wounds, and a wide variety of other medical equipment.

Additionally, drugs are NOT included in either category (although an implant may deliver a drug into the body). If you visit the FDA’s website, you’ll notice a distinct tab for “drugs” and another for “medical devices.” This separation could help you if you plan to research your procedure or if you have to file a complaint down the road.

I’m considering getting a device. What should I research?

Before getting an implant, ALWAYS do your research. It seems simple enough to take your doctor’s advice, because after all, he’s the one with the medical degree and experience, but you are your best advocate and you need to know the benefits and risks to your procedure. For example, millions of women had vaginal mesh put in them and have had to undergo repeated surgeries to fix complications. The mesh is made out of polypropylene which can erode, break apart, migrate, shrink, and cause other painful complications. Equally alarming is that it wasn’t properly tested before becoming the “gold standard” for repairing pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence. Knowing these facts could have prevented women around the world from unnecessary pain and devastation.

So here are a few ways to research the safety and effectiveness of your implant:

  • The FDA’s website is a good place to start. At the top right corner you’ll see a search box that says “Search FDA.” Type in the type of implant you’re planning on having (like breast implant, hip implant, vaginal mesh, etc.) and you’ll see a list of topics pop up. Choose the overview page first. If there are any warnings or FDA safety notifications about the product, you’ll see red highlighted text at the top of the page discussing the risks and problems that this device may be having. Scroll down and you’ll usually find what types of implants are available (such as metal, plastic, biologic, etc.), how to prepare for surgery, what risks and adverse effects to be aware of, and how the surgery will be done. But here’s a big problem: The FDA is underfunded and overwhelmed, so the website isn’t always up-to-date!!!!
  • Talk to your surgeon ahead of time and ask what specific brand and model of implant he or she is planning on using, then look it up. Find out how long it’s been on the market, if it was properly tested, can the device be removed if needed, how long will it last, how long did it take for others to start experiencing problems, and if there are lawsuits or recalls on it. You may also want to look into whether there are other options available that are safer and have less risks. Write down all of your questions and concerns and make an appointment to discuss them with your doctor.
  • Check out social media – As you may or may not know, there are specialized groups on social media and where you can ask people who have gone through the procedure about their outcomes. For instance, on Facebook you can type in “hip replacement” and you’ll see links to videos, groups, articles, and photos. You can even join a group and ask questions about recovery time, complications, and more.

My medical device is having a negative effect on my health. How do I report it?

First of all, call your doctor right away if you have any concerns at all. Fever, vomiting, increased pain and other symptoms may the start of a bigger problem. The sooner you address the issue, the better chance you have at recovery. Secondly, ALWAYS get a copy of your medical records whether you’re having complications or not. Not only will they detail your procedure, but it will have a card in it stating exactly what medical device you have including the brand, model, and serial number.

The FDA has a program called MedWatch where you can file a complaint form online. Click the button that says “Consumer/Patient” and you will be guided through a set of questions to share what implant you had and the complications you experienced. This is so important not only to track your own injuries, but to inform the FDA so that they can potentially analyze the data to protect others from harm.

 

##
Sources
“Implant Files: Frequently asked questions and resources for readers”. https://www.icij.org/investigations/implant-files/resources-for-patients-and-frequently-asked-questions/

Periscope Group is not owned by or operated on behalf of any attorney or law firm. We are not affiliated with any drug or medical device companies. We do not host advertisements nor do we accept advertising requests. We are here to help YOU, the consumer, become better educated and supported. You pay absolutely nothing for our help. It’s as simple as that.

Periscope Group is not owned by or operated on behalf of any attorney or law firm. We are not affiliated with any drug or medical device companies. We do not host advertisements nor do we accept advertising requests. We are here to help YOU, the consumer, become better educated and supported. You pay absolutely nothing for our help. It’s as simple as that.

HON Code Certification

© All Rights Reserved • 2017 • Periscope Group, 4155 Blackhawk Plaza Circle, Suite 100, Danville, CA 94506 Legal Disclaimer

Protected by Copyscape

© All Rights Reserved • 2017 • Periscope Group, 4155 Blackhawk Plaza Circle, Suite 100, Danville, CA 94506 Legal Disclaimer

HON Code Certification

Pin It on Pinterest