We’re exposed to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, every day. We’ve all read articles about how it’s linked to health issues including cancer, autism, gut health and more; that it’s one of the possible reasons for the declining bee population; and that there are varying opinions about how dangerous it really is. We’ve also heard from a bunch of our Facebook followers who have commented that their beloved dogs have passed away from cancer due to possible Roundup exposure, that they are concerned about neighbors using this popular product, and they question why the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government agencies aren’t doing more to protect the public.

Do Regulators REALLY Know How Much Roundup We’re Exposed To?
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With all of the noise surrounding this controversial topic, how much Roundup are we really exposed to and should we concerned?

How Much Roundup is Okay?

According to the EPA, these are the acceptable, or safe, levels of glyphosate that can be in our water and food supply: 0.7 mg/L or 700 ppb (parts per billion) as set by The National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWR). The Alliance for Natural Health shares that, “The EPA Allowable Daily Intake (ADI) for glyphosate is set at 1,750 µg (1.75 mg) per kg of bodyweight. The EU ADI is just 0.3 mg per kg of body weight.”   

So how do a few independent tests measure up to the EPA standards?

2016 Food Tests Conducted by The Alliance for Natural Health (ANH):

Do Regulators REALLY Know How Much Roundup We’re Exposed To?
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2019 Food Tests Conducted by the Environmental Working Group (EWG):

Do Regulators REALLY Know How Much Roundup We’re Exposed To?
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According to the EWG, their standard for safety is much stricter than the EPA’s setting the mark with glyphosate levels at 160 ppb.

Now let’s take a view from a different point of view. The Center on Environmental Health (CEH) tested 12 families for glyphosate levels and found that 11 tested positive. Among ten families, the children had higher levels of the chemical than their parents, the CEH said according to Yahoo! Finance. 

So How Much Roundup are We REALLY Being Exposed To?

Basically, these are two billion-dollar questions (it’s been reported that Monsanto made approximately $14 billion in 2017 and one plaintiff was award $2 billion before the judge reduced it to $86 million): 1) How much Roundup is too much? And 2) How much Roundup are we exposed to? 

With glyphosate, there’s surprisingly one answer that most people seem to agree on: 

We don’t know.

But here’s what we DO know:

  • The ANH study reveals several important findings including the high levels of glyphosate in eggs and dairy cream. “These animal products are not sprayed directly with glyphosate, which indicates that the chemical is entering the food chain and building up in the tissues of the animals, otherwise known as bioaccumulation. If glyphosate can accumulate in the animals we eat, it must also accumulate in humans.” 
  • The EWG shows that children are eating excessive amounts of glyphosate in their morning breakfasts and daily snacks. This could account for the increase in numbers of childhood conditions such as ADHD, autism, food allergies, and even cancer. In fact, 12-year-old Jake Bellah from California is the first child to file a claim against Monsanto/Bayer the makers of Roundup – due to his non-Hodkin’s lymphoma diagnosis. 
  • We also know where traces have been found: as mentioned, it’s in our food, but it was also found in 100% of Calfornia wines that were tested in 2018. A study from 1997-2005 conducted along the Mississippi Delta agricultural region found Roundup in 86% of air samples and 77% of rain samples. Over 130 million kilograms of glyphosate was used in 2016 and the top three states that use the most are California, Washington, and Illinois. It’s on our playgrounds, golf courses, schoolyards, neighbor’s garden, drinking water, groundwater, lakes, and more. 

And what we’re learning…

  • It’s not just glyphosate that is toxic, but the other chemicals that are mixed into it to create the various Roundup formulations. These additives are said to allow the glyphosate to penetrate into the plant more readily or to cling to the sprayed areas for increased effectiveness. However, these formulations aren’t tested for human safety so we don’t know the long term effects. “So that makes it very difficult for a toxicologist to test the different ingredients to figure out what’s the most toxic, or what’s contributing to it,” says Vanessa Fitsanakis, a neurotoxicologist at Northeast Ohio Medical University, in The Scientist. “From a research perspective, I can’t tell which component might need to be changed [to reduce possible toxicity] in those formulations because I don’t know what some of those components are.”
  • We also don’t know the long term effects of genetically modified (GM) crops. These “Roundup Ready” plants have an altered structure that prevents them from being harmed by glyphosate; while the weeds die, the plants thrive. The additional problem is that the longer Roundup is used, the more the weeds are becoming resistant causing the company to formulate more destructive chemicals.
  • We’re also learning that the link between agricultural workers who use glyphosate and those who are being diagnosed with cancer is getting stronger. In a study involving studies from UC Berkeley, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, and the University of Washington, scientists found that “people with the highest exposure to glyphosate had a 41% higher risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.”

Glyphosate and Non-Hodkin’s Lymphoma

In the last two cases that have gone to trial, the juries have found in favor of the plaintiffs who claimed that Roundup and glyphosate were the cause of their non-Hodkin’s lymphoma. If you or a loved one used Roundup and were diagnosed with this type of cancer, please call Periscope Group today at (800) 511-3838. Time is of the essence, as Bayer’s Chief Executive, Werner Baumann, told analysts in a conference call last week that “In general, we will of course only consider settlement if financially reasonable and if we can achieve finality of the overall litigation.”

This means that once these claims are settled, it may be too late to get the compensation owed to you. Call us today. We want to hear your story.

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Sources
“Ground Water and Drinking Water”. EPA. Accessed July 31, 2019. https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water/national-primary-drinking-water-regulations
“Glyphosate Levels in Breakfast Foods: What is safe?”. The Alliance for Natural Health. Accessed July 31, 2019. https://anh-usa.org/glyphosate-breakfast-report/
“In New Round of Tests, Monsanto’s Weedkiller Still Contaminates Foods Marketed to Children”. EWG’s Children’s Health Initiative. Accessed July 31, 2019. https://www.ewg.org/childrenshealth/monsanto-weedkiller-still-contaminates-foods-marketed-to-children/
“Glyphosate, amid courtroom battles, faces a test inside America’s homes”. CBS News. Accessed July 31, 2019. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/glyphosate-weed-killer-roundup-faces-questions-about-exposure-in-children/?ftag=CNM-00-10aac3a
“Bayer sees glyphosate settlement only if financially reasonable”. Yahoo! Finance. Accessed July 31, 2019. https://finance.yahoo.com/news/bayer-sees-glyphosate-settlement-only-140903509.html?.tsrc=applewf
“An Update on the Monsanto Roundup Lawsuits Cases”. Space Coast Daily. Accessed July 31, 2019. https://spacecoastdaily.com/2019/07/an-update-on-the-monsanto-roundup-lawsuits-cases/
“Does The Herbicide RoundUp® Cause Cancer?”. Forbes. Accessed July 31, 2019. https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevensalzberg/2019/02/18/does-the-herbicide-roundup-cause-cancer/#2c944cfc21b4